Sunday, July 28, 2013

Primary Surface Area of My Online Identity

I am always working to define myself, in both the physical world and the virtual one that has become an increasing part of my identity. As part of this work, I'm spending some time trying to understand the primary surface area of online identity. Sure there are other aspects, but this is the face that most of you will see.

Name: Kin Lane

Title: API Evangelist

Company: API Evangelist

Location: Hermosa Beach, CA

Description: API Evangelist, Hacker, Tech Gypsy, Beer Snob and Father

Photo: https://s3.amazonaws.com/kinlane-productions/kin-lane/KinLane-04-2012-Headshot-3-250.jpg 

Email: info@kinlane.com

Phone: (541) 357-9073

Blog Profile(s):

Social Profile(s):

Device Profile(s):

  • Laptop - Mozilla/5.0 (Macintosh; Intel Mac OS X 10_8_4) AppleWebKit/537.36 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/28.0.1500.71 Safari/537.36
  • IPhone - Mozilla/5.0 (iPhone; CPU iPhone OS 6_1_3 like Mac OS X) AppleWebKit/536.26 (KHTML, like Gecko) CriOS/28.0.1500.12 Mobile/10B329 Safari/8536.25
  • Tablet - Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; Android 4.2.2; Nexus 7 Build/JDQ39) AppleWebKit/535.19 (KHTML, like Gecko) Chrome/18.0.1025.166 Safari/535.19


from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/KinLane/~3/w2PANS7Z9TQ/primary-surface-area-of-my-online-identity

Sunday, July 21, 2013

The Next Decade is Going to Be A Wild Ride

I turned 41 in June. As I retool, reboot and readjust during what I guess could be called "vacation", I'm reflecting on the last year and the major shift that has gone on in my world.

First off, turning 40 was hard. Usually birthdays come and go without any concern, but 40 was not easy for me. I'll spare you the details, but the first half of 2012 was a very trying period, and by the time my birthday came around in June I was not a happy camper.

With this in mind, looking back at the last 12 months, I can see it was about transition, and preparing for the period of my life. While the first part of 2012 was an uphill drive, during the second half things seem to fall into place, allowing me to shift gears, pick up speed, setting a significantly new pace for what I see as the next decade of my life.

In 2010, I realized my career trajectory, after achieving a VP level position, working on SAP and Google events was not satisfying for me, and I needed a course correction. I wanted to make sure I was doing something meaningful, but spoke to my experience in architecting distributed, data driven sites and applications.

I had just had a very meaningful experiences in scaling architecture for SAP and Google, powered by application programming interfaces (API) and the cloud. I seen the potential of APIs, in not just designing distributed apps, but make them scalable, portable, collaborative and modular--opening up not just a new way to design web applications, but mobile applications, while also introducing companies to new, more transparent ways of conducting business.

Its been 3 years since I made the decision to do API Evangelist, dedicating my world to studying not just the technical, but the business and politics of providing and consuming APIs. While studying the space, I've worked hard to tell the story of my research, finding a unique voice that was informative, while also establishing enough credibility, so that people would find my research and stories something worth listening to, sharing and re-using.

I strongly believe there is a some amazing changes going on in business, government and our personal lives--changes that are being powered via APIs. We can make meaningful change in our world through opening up data and resources via APIs, but at the same time, the potential for great damage to privacy, markets and other negative influences exist. This intersection of the good and the bad of APIs is where I want to exist. Not being dogmatic about any particular technology or approach, but openly showcasing and discussing how APIs are being used wisely, and where APIs are being used in potentially harmful ways.

After two years of studying and telling stories at this intersection, last summer things started shifting. An awakening had occurred around APIs, with government taking notice, the enterprise and some of the largest global companies suddenly seeing there was something important happening here. APIs weren't just for mashups, they could truly provide the data and resources for the growing demand for web, mobile and even an Internet of things--where common objects around us are connected to the web in real-time.

Now in the summer of 2013, I don't feel like I need to be a cheerleader for APIs anymore, and I am allowed to evolve my approach. I want to maintain my research and monitoring of both providing and consuming APIs, keeping an eye on trends and being a champion of the priorities like government, education and healthcare. To support this, over the last year I've successfully migrated my research and storytelling to a new, agile way of reading, curating, organizing and writing of short and long form stories from the API space--while staying true to the intersection of technology, business and politics.

While not perfect, my website(s) API Evangelist, API Voice, API Stack, Hacker Storytelling and Kin Lane make me happy in their current state. Also while not perfect, I'm happy with the financial side of my world. I don't make a lot of money, but I find enough support to make ends meet, while staying focused on what is important and staying independent of any single company or product.

I have spent the last 3 weeks, enjoying time with my daughter Kaia, and my partner in crime Audrey in one of our favorite places on earth, Hermosa Beach. While I've been reading, writing and doing some coding, I've been soaking in the sun and relaxing, making sure all my projects are wrapped up, allowing my platform to go into a maintenance mode, with no new work being added. I will just maintain the current level of monitoring, curation and publishing I've done to date. Nothing more.

At the time of this writing, I'm getting on a plane to Boston, then driving to Maine and spend a week relaxing with Audrey's family. I'm really looking forward to this time with not just Kaia and Audrey, but also with her family in such a beautiful place, during such a perfect time of year. I couldn't be more content.

Once done in Maine I will come back to LA, pick up a friend of Kaia's from San Diego, and help another friend caravan to Oregon. This will end an amazing summer with Kaia. While in Oregon I will see family, friends as well as the continued business conversations I can't help but have. Then return to Los Angeles the first week in August.

Just days after I return, I will move to Washington D.C., and begin my one year as a Presidential Innovation Fellow, working the Department of Veterans Affairs.

I'm finding it hard to relax, and thoroughly enjoy my time with Kaia this summer, but I will do it. I'm super excited about the opportunity in front of me. My 40th year was pretty stellar, but now my 41st year will be spent in our nations capital, learning how our government works and tackling some of the biggest and in my opinion, some of the most meaningful challenges we face today--supporting our veterans.

In contrast to last summer, this July I'm extremely grateful for the last 12 months, and I'm not just optimistic for the next year, I'm totally psyched for the wild ride that is just getting started. The momentum Audrey and I have successfully achieved over the last three years with API Evangelist and Hack Education, and now we will spend the next year in Washington D.C.

I can tell the stage is being nset for a seriously wild ride for the next decade, and hopefully beyond!



from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/KinLane/~3/hZFV8Vxfwk0/the-next-decade-is-going-to-be-a-wild-ride

I Do Not See Things As Black or White

As I prepare to go to Washington DC, to work with the Department of Veterans Affiars (VA), I'm spending a lot of time thinking about how I'll prepare for my year, working within the federal government.  

Working for the White House, and at the VA, will most definitely be an entirely new experience for me, I feel my approach and experience within the API space will benefit me greatly. 

When it comes to the tech, business and politics of APIs I don't see things as:

black #000000  

 

OR

white #FFFFFF  

 

I see things as grey, and try to empathize and understand with as many of the shades of grey as possible:

#080808   #0A0A0A   #0D0D0D  
#0F0F0F   #121212   #141414  
#171717   #1A1A1A   #1C1C1C  
#1F1F1F   #212121   #242424  
#262626   #292929   #2B2B2B  
#2E2E2E   #303030   #333333  
#363636   #383838   #3B3B3B  
#3D3D3D   #404040   #424242  
#454545   #474747   #4A4A4A  
#4D4D4D   #4F4F4F   #525252  
#555555   #575757   #595959  
#5C5C5C   #5E5E5E   #616161  
#636363   #666666   #696969  
#696969   #6B6B6B   #6E6E6E  
#707070   #737373   #757575  
#787878   #7A7A7A   #7D7D7D  
#808080   #7F7F7F   #808080  
#828282   #858585   #878787  
#8A8A8A   #8C8C8C   #8F8F8F  
#919191   #949494   #969696  
#999999   #9C9C9C   #9E9E9E  
#A1A1A1   #A3A3A3   #A6A6A6  
#A9A9A9   #A8A8A8   #A9A9A9  
#ABABAB   #AAAAAA   #ADADAD  
#B0B0B0   #B3B3B3   #B5B5B5  
#B8B8B8   #BABABA   #BDBDBD  
#C0C0C0   #BEBEBE   #BFBFBF  
#C2C2C2   #C4C4C4   #C7C7C7  
#C9C9C9   #CDCDCD   #CCCCCC  
#CFCFCF   #D1D1D1   #D4D4D4  
#D3D3D3   #D3D3D3   #D6D6D6  
#D9D9D9   #DCDCDC   #DBDBDB  
#DEDEDE   #E0E0E0   #E3E3E3  
#E5E5E5   #E8E8E8   #EBEBEB  
#EDEDED   #F0F0F0   #F2F2F2  
#F5F5F5   #F7F7F7   #FAFAFA  

This approach to monitoring the API universe has allowed me to better understand the differences between APIs and the companie or individauls behind them.  

I feel this will help me understand how Washington works, and continue to find, simple, meaningful, API driven approaches to helping our government innovate.



from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/KinLane/~3/y1eEgvleL-Q/i-do-not-see-things-as-black-or-white

Thursday, July 11, 2013

Prose.io Like Application for Simple Data Editing

If you haven't use Prose.io, for editing of markup and markdown content in your Github repositories, I highly recommend it. Prose.io provides a dead simple editor for content, which works very will for managing static page or blog content stored in a Github repository, and made public using Github Pages. 

I use Prose.io to easily manage content across many projects I maintain. I like the concept of a dead simple editor that connects to Github using oAuth and assists me in managing repositories of information.

I would like to see a similar app, but instead of markup and markdown it is for simple management of data, allowing me to:

  • Import / Export Spreadsheet
  • Import / Export CSV
  • Import / Export TSV
  • Import / Export from Google Spreadsheet

This application could provide a simple visual table editor for working with smaller data sets, allowing users to get the data in, via a preferred format as well as export in a similiar desired format. Allowing editing in a common table format in between import and export.

Even though I have been working as a database administrator for over 20 years, I have found myself working with simple JSON, CSV data sets that are stored in repositories lately. Having a dead simple, web-based data editor would go along way in supporting the open data movement.

Dateditor.io is available, and would make a nice addition to my Hacker Storytelling toolbox. I wish I had more time, I would build myself, but I am happy to help support someone else running with as an open source tool.



from http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/KinLane/~3/3x2CLvw3cJc/proseio-like-application-for-simple-data-editing

Saturday, July 6, 2013

My Hacker Storytelling Toolbox

I'm working with a variety of tools and services to keep up with my daily research, curation, analysis and ultimately publishing of stories from the world of APIs.

Over the last six months I've migrated to an approach I've called Hacker Storytelling. My goal is to efficiently discover, organize and publish as many meaningful stories around the best practices in the business of APIs, as I can, while encouraging the widest possible distribution as I can.

Hacker Storytelling currently centers around publishing of micro project sites as Github repositories using a simple, blog-aware, static site generator called Jekyll. You can do a lot of storytelling with static markup or markdown via pages and chronological blog posts.

Even with pages and blogs, I need more fuel for my stories. I use Mustache + JSON to display everything from simple bulleted or numbered lists, t company and tool listings. Mustache allows me to maintain a central data store, which I use as efficiently as I can across all the stories I tell.

To help me acquire this data, I depend on multiple APIs, but when it comes down to it, a lot of my data is harvested or scraped. To manage my harvesting I use ScraperWiki, to acquire, cleanup and deliver in a structured data in a JSON format. I maintain a vast archive of data as JSON files, across multiple Github repositories where I use JSON Editor Online to edit in a quick and dirty way. Adding the essential, human element to my curation algorithm.

In addition to my projects, I do a lot of speaking. I have a standard approach to publishing content from my central content and data stores as presentations. Each conference keynote or session I do, as well as presentations for meet ups, hackathons or even internally at various companies is centered around a presentation i custom build at the moemnt of delivery. I use either deck.js or reveal.js for my presentation delivery tool, as opposed to a classic Powerpoint or newer Google Presentation.

Once I create static pages, blog posts and presentations using content and data I've curated and written, I need a place to put it. I usually start with a Github repository, using Git as the central project management platform. After that, if I want a project to have a public life, I will publish to the web using Github Pages, Amazon S3 or Dropbox, depending on my goals around the project.

You can find a list of services and tools I'm currently using on the Hacker Storytelling Toolbox page. I will keep it up to date as I find new tools and services. If there is anything you think I should consider, that contributes to your own storytelling process, please let me know.



from /2013/07/06/my-hacker-storytelling-toolbox

Prose io Like Application for Simple Data Editing

If you haven't use Prose.io, for editing of markup and markdown content in your Github repositories, I highly recommend it. Prose.io provides a dead simple editor for content, which works very will for managing static page or blog content stored in a Github repository, and made public using Github Pages. 

I use Prose.io to easily manage content across many projects I maintain. I like the concept of a dead simple editor that connects to Github using oAuth and assists me in managing repositories of information.

I would like to see a similar app, but instead of markup and markdown it is for simple management of data, allowing me to:

  • Import / Export Spreadsheet
  • Import / Export CSV
  • Import / Export TSV
  • Import / Export from Google Spreadsheet

This application could provide a simple visual table editor for working with smaller data sets, allowing users to get the data in, via a preferred format as well as export in a similiar desired format. Allowing editing in a common table format in between import and export.

Even though I have been working as a database administrator for over 20 years, I have found myself working with simple JSON, CSV data sets that are stored in repositories lately. Having a dead simple, web-based data editor would go along way in supporting the open data movement.

Dateditor.io is available, and would make a nice addition to my Hacker Storytelling toolbox. I wish I had more time, I would build myself, but I am happy to help support someone else running with as an open source tool.



from /2013/07/06/prose-io-like-application-for-simple-data-editing

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

Infographic Single Page Applications

Infographics have always drove me nuts. Aside from being visually attractive, they are worthless. They offer no value, except just being eye candy.

The more I spend more time working with concepts like the Single Page Application (SPA) and Hacker Storytelling, the more I desire a more meaningful replacement for the current infographic.

I would like to start seeing more data driven, visually appealing infographics that are done with the same class as an SPA. Each section of an infographic would be a JavaScript widget that is connected to a JSON data source or a live JSON API.

The entire infographic could potentially be interactive, allowing people to play with the data, turn knobs and dials and get a feel for the data behind the visual. Additionally, savvy users could also access and download or fork the data behind each inographic.

Each interactive info raphic SPA could be hosted on Github pages, and provide a image capture or generate PDF feature so you could capture your classic image of an infographic, then share and syndicate as your heart desires.

The infographic SPA could also be embeddable so you could place a smaller version on other sites, with the ability to expand and see the full version, really bringing home the concept of syndication.

I just can't help but think the current definition of an infographic is a severe failure of the imagination. While some can be nice looking, they lack the depth that is possible within the current data rich, API driven and sexy HTML5 world we currently live in.



from /2013/07/03/infographic-single-page-applications